Comedy Class | Burbank | Saturdays

 WE DEVELOP COMEDIANS!

“WINNER” – 2013 CALIFORNIA’S FUNNIEST FEMALE 

PAULINE YASUDA

“WINNER” – 2011 L.A.’S FUNNIEST COMIC (UNDER 2YRS) 

JC MORGAN

“2ND PLACE FINALIST” – 2012 L.A.’S FUNNIEST COMIC (UNDER 2YRS)

ESTHER HERSH


Latest Graduating class at the Comedy Store

Jerry Corley’s Stand Up Comedy Clinic is a powerful 8-week comedy class focusing on writing and performing comedy, followed by a performance at the world famous Comedy Store.

Can you learn to be funny? Once you learn the structure of comedy and the secrets to what makes people laugh, you can learn to build those into your conversations and write them into your comedy routines. So the answer is a resounding YES! You can learn to be funny! We have student after student who can prove it too!

You know the difference between a chuckle and a triggered laugh. You’ve experienced it either by receiving it from your friends, family or an audience. You’ve had your own laugh reflex push out the laugh when something funny triggered your laughter. comedy seminar photo1

 

Now, how do you write material that can trigger laughter in others? Are you born with that gift or can it be taught?


JERRY CORLEY CAN TEACH YOU HOW TO BE FUNNY! 

From 4-7:30 PM, each Saturday evening, for 8 weeks. You will learn what triggers human laughter, how to write and deliver jokes that trigger that laughter. You will also learn some of the most powerful comedy skills in the trade, and  how to make money in the comedy business. 

Whether you want to be a comedian, a humor columnist, sitcom or screenplay writer, this class is for you!

We also offer Tuesday Night Classes!

Visit the website link at the bottom of this page for more info!

THE MOST POWERFUL COMEDY CLASS IN THE BUSINESS…BAR NONE! 

 

NEW CLASSES FORMING. SIGN UP NOW!


BE FUNNY.    GET PAID.    ANY QUESTIONS?

Visit StandUpComedyClinic.com for more details!

 

Comedy Class Student Lands Comedy Central Gig

2005-08-17 16.21.29One of the goals of a young comedian is to land a gig on Comedy Central, but what happens when you’re far past your twenties?

Do the goals change? In a word, No.

Comedy Clinic student Esther Hersh is a perfect example. When she arrived in comedy class a few weeks ago, instead of running her set, she wanted to rehearse a piece for The Ben Show she was auditioning for the next day on Comedy Central.

She was auditioning for the role of “Gangsta Granny” in a sketch.

We spent about twenty minutes helping her get comfortable with the language of the piece. Even though Esther is referred to as the “Sassy Senior,” it’s no easy task getting a Jewish Senior Citizen from Studio City comfortable with saying “M-F-er!”

And that was her opening line!

We told her that 90-percent of communication in this type of presentation is attitude, emotion and tone of voice and only 10-percent is the words, so she drove the words with a Gangsta attitude.

And just after a couple tries, Esther was pouring out lines that sounded more like a piece from a Richard Pryor routine.

Set that against the fact that she’s all of 5-feet, two inches and holding an AK-47 and you have blaring INCONGRUITY staring you in the face.

Pure comedy formula.

Needless to say Esther booked the job! She’ll be airing on Comedy Central on the premiere episode of The Ben Show starring Ben Hoffman this Thursday, February 28th on Comedy Central.  Check it out!

Way to go, Esther!!!

That kind of success, just makes me want to say “M-F-er!”

George Carlin May Be Dead; But Wordplay is Alive!

George Carlin - Modern Man

Wordplay in comedy is ‘hack!"

If you believed some comedians in this industry, you might think that statement is true.

If someone said that to me today, I would tell them that one of the most memorable comedy bits in all of comedy is George Carlin’s "Seven Words You Can’t Say On T.V."

It’s pure wordplay.

They might counter that with, "Well that was a long time ago."

And I might let them believe that they’re right and let them begin that fall into the abyss of ignorance and arrogance that usually accompanies a comedian who’s been doing comedy for all of four or five years.

But not you. I would never let you fall into that abyss.

The readers of my blog–all three of you–I’ll try to not only guide you but give you supporting evidence from one the the masters…

George Carlin; a master wordsmith in comedy.

Ironic, considering that he left school in 9th grade.

And although the argument that "Seven Words" is from a different era and that it wouldn’t play today might hold some relevance; though I doubt it, I give you "Modern Man," a bit of pure wordplay comedy that Carlin did in his later years.

And I dare you tell me it’s ‘hack.’

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How to Write A Joke – Jerry Seinfeld Style

This is cool!

As you might already know about me, I’m a huge fan of Jerry Seinfeld. I studied him when I was first starting comedy right alongside two of my other heroes, George Carlin and Richard Pryor.

I know, what an interesting juxtaposition! Carlin, Seinfeld, Pryor. Considering that combination you’d think my jokes might start out, “I think bugs were our first friends, you ever notice how bugs walk? Them ‘muthufuckahs’ be like…”

But alas, I my jokes aren’t nearly as clever or interesting sounding… (throat-clearing to indicate sarcasm)…

Anyway, to the point of this blog post; In my previous post I gave you all a link to an awesome New York Times interview with Jerry Seinfeld. In the interview you may have learned how Seinfeld is considered a scientist when it comes to comedy. He dissects a joke and looks for the littlest nuances to make the joke funny.

That was in the meat of the interview but if your own interest in nuance was engaged, you may have seen this little tidbit off to the side…

In the N.Y. Times journey to become more internet savvy they’ve begun to add little morsels in their sidebars to keep the reader interested.

I love this interview with Seinfeld that they posted on how he writes a joke…

He even gets down to the nitty-gritty of what kind of pens he uses and his long-hand style of writing!

It starts out in typical Jerry Seinfeld style: “I know you think people are going to be interested in this… but they’re not…”

How to write comedy - Jerry Seinfeld style

Comedy Class | Getting Your Time Cut

 

flappersWe had our combined showcase this Thursday at Flappers Comedy Club in Burbank, for our Beginning/Advanced comedy class.

The bill was filled with 18 comedians ready to hit the stage to showcase. That’s a lot of comedians for one show, but to top it off we had to complete the show in a timely manner, because we had to clear the mainroom to let it get set for the late show.

Talk about pressure! Mix in with that the fact that I had a baby-sitter fall through and had to miss the show and you’ve got a tough beginning to an evening that had its obstacles.

Then the comedians, many of them doing a showcase for the very first time arrived to the club to discover that their time had been cut back from seven minutes to six. It can be stressful for a comedian to have to suddenly cut their time, especially for a newbie.

But the show went on and as I hear it (I can’t wait to get the video), and the show was great. Everyone did their best and had good sets. The show ended on time–for the most part… and, despite the stress of time-cuts, nobody died from a brain aneurism or anything like that.

Getting your time cut is commonplace in this business. I have a friend, Don Richardson, a professional comedian for 25 years, a regular at the Comedy Store. Don’s a real pro with real world experience who possesses a very good reputation…

One night he showed up at the Comedy Store for his scheduled 10pm set. As Don arrived at the Comedy Store he checked the list and there were 8 comedians that still needed to go on.  Just then, Andrew Dice Clay took the stage in the Original Room in a surprise appearance. Dice decided to do an hour and a half. By the time Dice finished, it was 11 o’clock and with the 8 comics still remaining.

Don knew he probably wasn’t going to get on that night.

I asked him how he felt about that. He said, “In this business, these things happen. You’ve got to learned to roll with the punches., It could be worse. I could be punching a clock. 

So there’s a great lesson to be learned here. That lesson is this: from the best laid scenarios to the worst planned events, comedians have to learn to be able to adjust to the show. A comedian is a rare person. They not only can make an audience of strangers laugh, they can do it under circumstances that are not always ideal.

We learn as comedians to take these things in stride. For some of you this may the first time something like this happened, but I assure you that if you continue in the comedy business it won’t be the last. Having your time cut short is a common thing to deal with in this business called show business. It’s so common, it becomes part of your craft.

You might be a solo act on stage as a comedian or a duo, or whatever, but in the total scheme you’ve got to be a utility man, you’ve got to be the guy or guys (and I say that not to leave out girls, but because of language limitation), who can roll with the punches and rise to the occasion under any circumstances.

On one hand as a comedy student, you prepared for a seven minute act. On the other hand you learned an advanced lesson and you’ve had real-world comedy experience, just like Don Richardson.

Have you encountered a similar situation? Or have a war story? Share it!