Getting Gigs – Student Byron Valino Hits the Road

byron valino

The dream is to stand on stage, hold that mic and tell your jokes, do your bits, get some laughs.

Then you usually want to do it again… and again. But after doing the mics around town and getting in more than your fair share of ‘bringer’ shows, something gnaws at you to move beyond that. You want to do it in front of a ‘real’ audience.

Some of you might even have the desire to take your act on the road for a spell.

And get paid.

So how do you do get to go on the road and get paid? In a word, the answer is ‘work.’

Hard work.

Getting the Gigs is About Work and Relationships

Usually in order to hit the road these days you need to have about thirty minutes of material. Being able to get up in front of an audience and do thirty minutes, a solid thirty, qualifies you to work as a ‘feature act.’ A feature act is usually the comedian who goes on after the emcee and before the headliner.

So Byron writes and he writes and he writes. He’s got all his jokes organized in his Evernote app. Every class he brings in the new material he’s working on along with some of his older stuff.

We tweak the new material, tighten the structure, clarify the associations that sometimes keep the joke from tracking clearly, we add act-outs, tags, toppers, etc.

Taking the notes from the feedback in class and adding it to the material helps the material develop faster and helps you reach your laugh-point goals. The class also gives Byron a weekly writing goal.

The second thing that Byron does well is he goes out to the mics. He mingles. He meets people. That’s how he got this gig.

In my classes, I also hook up comedians (who are ready) with some of the bookers I have relationships with, who book these gigs.

Sometimes, just a word to the booker can help that booker feel like they are making a more informed decision to book a new comedian.

 

Getting the gig is only one step. Now you gotta hit the road, shake off the nerves and get up on stage in a strange place with a new kind of pressure.

A Comedian Must Learn to Take Some ‘Bullets’

On the road, the feature act has to take some bullets.

In an ‘A’ comedy club, there is usually a house emcee who does about ten minutes and warms up the audience.

But in a one-niter club, it’s a little different. You’re usually in a converted bar, or showroom of some sort and the emcee is a bartender or a local guy who gets up and tells a joke or two (if you’re lucky), then introduces the feature act; sometimes in a way that barely resembles and introduction.

Most of these guys haven’t had any training, they haven’t really warmed up the audience… they just bring you up to a cold room and a cold stage. As a result, the feature comedian is now responsible for warming up the audience, getting some laughs and keeping their attention.

Sometimes it takes a few minutes; in some cases, thirty minutes.

That’s why we call it ‘taking bullets.’

But if you’ve done your work, if you’ve put in your time and you display your showmanship; never letting them see you sweat, following through with your professionalism and your ‘A’ material, then you could do really well…

… and if you’re smart, you’ll learn a thing or two.

Or a million things.

Byron Hits The Road

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Mill Casino Coos Bay, Oregon

That’s what Comedy Clinic student, Bryon Valino did last week. He hit the road, went up to Oregon and performed at the Mill Casino in North Bend. His first ‘road’ gig.

The feedback was solid. He got good laughs in the early show, with the older crowd and didn’t get as many laughs in the later show, with the younger crowd.

Byron’s worked other show situations in town and out to get him prepared for the road gig. He did some college shows for Cal State Northridge and he booked a local comedy club with comedian and friend Tony Ming and they put butts in the seats and did 20-30 minutes each to get prepared.

Byron’s got some solid material. His delivery is somewhere between a version of Steven Wright and Anthony Jeselnik. It’s not fast, it’s not super edgy or tremendously energetic. But he is funny.

It’s one of those acts that needs the audience to pay attention. He’ll do great in ‘A’ clubs where the audience is there to do one thing; watch comedy, but in some of the road rooms, the comedy show is just a way to kill time, maybe get drunk before going dancing or to a party or to ‘hook up.’ In those rooms, you learn to work a lot harder.

Why Do Those Gigs?

Some people ask if those gigs aren’t as great, why do them? For that answer we might ask the mountain climber why he climbs Kilimanjaro; ‘Because it’s there.’

Those gigs give you chops. They give you a great place to practice doing your thirty. They build you stronger and faster and sharpen your instincts like nothing else. And like climbing Kilimanjaro, you could die.

In a nutshell, when you learn to play the road, you can play anywhere.

It Helps to Work with a Good Headlining Comedian

When you play the road, you come back a better performer. Instantly more seasoned and with a fire to do more, work harder and get back out there. Especially if you were lucky enough to work with a good and helpful headliner.

tommy savitt

Tommy Savitt

Bryon worked with Tommy Savitt. Tommy is an award-winning comedian who’s been on the road almost as long as I have. Tommy has done T.V. and toured all over the world. Tommy’s got chops. He’s also got compassion and he chatted with Byron both before and after his sets.

So Byron did the work, developed his set, hit the road and did his thirty minutes.

Can’t wait to see him again in class. He’ll be sharper, stronger, fearless and ready to develop more material. Because something tells me he’s got a new goal; to get to sixty minutes.

You Rock, Byron! Keep up the solid work, soon it will be your name on the Marquis!

Take a moment to leave a comment below and send a shout out to Byron!

“You Changed My Life!” Can You Turn a Supermodel into a Comedian?

Can you turn a supermodel into a comedian?

Eugenia Kuzmina Comedian

I’ve been comedian for nearly thirty years. I have been coaching comedians, (formally), for about six years. During that time I’ve had a lot of thrills, but nothing can replace the feeling you get when you receive a text like this:

eugenia kuzmina text screenshot

“You changed my life.”

Woah. Humbling.

About two years ago, I was sitting at home writing and the phone rang. The voice on the other end of the line was a woman’s. There was an accent. I couldn’t figure it out where it was from.

You know when you can’t quite figure out the accent right away?

The woman’s voice said, “Hello. I’m so glad you answered. My name is Eugenia Kuzmina. I am a model and I want to be a stand-up comedian.”

“Tell me about yourself,” I said. She said she was Russian and that she had always been interested by stand-up comedy and that I came highly recommended. (I’ll take flattery anywhere I can get it so, listened further).

I was on the fence as to whether or not I wanted to take her on as a student. I believe you can teach anyone the craft of comedy. I’ve taught people who I was told were the “most unfunny person I’ve ever met,” and I’ve taught people with brain damage and I’ve learned long ago not to prejudge anyone’s ability.

I got beyond that a long time ago. There have been too many young comedians, athletes and musicians have proved me wrong.

But I was busy and I didn’t want someone who was going to be a headache. So I said to this model: “I’m going to send you an email with an introduction. Let’s pretend that I am an emcee introducing you on the stage. I want you to answer the email and come up with a response that you think is funny.”

In the email said: “Ladies and Gentlemen, our next performer comes to us from the world of high fashion. In fact she must be really hungry because I just saw her in the green room devouring an entire Tic-Tac. Please help me welcome, Eugenia Kuzmina!”

About twenty minutes later, I received an email from Eugenia. Her response was: “Devouring an entire Tic-Tac. That is funny, but not true. I am a model, I would never eat an entire meal at one sitting…”

We booked our first meeting.

Since then, Eugenia has appeared the World Famous Comedy Store a number of times, she has signed with several new agents (because of stand-up), and recently booked her first appearance as a comedian in Las Vegas in the Paul Scally Show at the Grand Hotel.

Now Eugenia has been doing some impromptu sketch comedy, pulling pranks with the public, including a prank she pulled in France at the Cannes Film Festival that has studios requesting meetings… to do comedy.

So can you turn a supermodel into a comedian? Time will tell, but I think the answer is leaning toward a resounding “YES.”

Now, I know some people are going to get upset about this post. Some might suggest that I’m focusing on what society might consider as “pretty.”

The point of this post is not to create an argument about who or what is ‘pretty’ in this business. The point of the post is to direct attention to the fact that the face of comedy is changing.

Traditionally, women who were considered “pretty” weren’t looked at as serious comedians. But as a comedian, part of what I do is to shatter the status quo.

I’m a firm believer in the fact that females can be funny. I believe that the precedent that was set by Johnny Carson set nearly thirty years ago when he said that pretty women don’t belong in comedy was flawed.

Not only that, I believe that they don’t have to play down their femininity to get a laugh. Amy Schumer has been proving that and I’ve had several female comedians in my classes who are beautiful AND funny who’ve gone on to have success.

I’ve coached the lovely actress Sascha Knopf, to help her reach the finals of California’s Funniest Female,

Sascha Knopf Comedian

I worked with Andi Wagner-Barton (bottom-left) who went on to get an agent, book several commercials and her first role in a film.

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And I’m fortunate enough to work with the lovely and feisty Laura Lee Botsacos. Who just booked her first paid gig at Aces Comedy Club in Murrieta, CA.

It’s fun and heart-warming to be a part of a movement that has (pardon the pun) dug its heels into the comedy scene around the globe and is changing the perception of what has been traditionally recognized as funny.

So ladies, whether you’re a supermodel or an athlete; a mom or a nerd, if you’ve thought about doing stand-up, (or taking a class)–just like these ladies–success on the comedy stage could be just around the corner.

Drop by the Comedy Clinic to say “hi,” or sit in a class. Our comedy community is amazing and supportive. And in our green room, we even have Tic-Tacs.

When You Do the Work…

joshua-jackson

Just wanted to post a quick shout-out to my boy Joshua Jackson.

Joshua just won the Clairmont Comedy Competition in–of all places–Clairmont, California.

I was humbled that Joshua thanked me in his celebratory post on Facebook.

Josh attended the Stand Up Comedy Clinic for a while and busted his butt developing his act.

Week after week Josh went from a guy who didn’t do a lot of stand-up to really developing into someone who understood the fundamentals.

Every week Josh showed up to class early, asked questions before class, was not afraid to disagree when something wasn’t working, and applied the new lessons he learned to his material.

Then what happened?

Every week he would get better. His act got tighter.

He had a terrific showcase set at the end of the class session.

Then he’s continued to develop by performing and learning and finding his voice, knowing that stand-up comedy is a blend, a craft of comedy structure and genuine persona.

Stand-up is not just getting up there and telling stories. Stand-up is about consistency; being able to get up there night and after night and deliver.

Comedy is about your character trying his best and continuously bumping into obstacles along the way. That is the underlying structure to all comedy.

It’s structure that gets the laughs gets the bookings and wins competitions. If you look at the sets on T.V., they are structured. You look at all the successful comedians, they use structure.

Which is why we teach it at the Comedy Clinic. Structure pays off and it’s what gets you the laughs per minute that are coveted by talent coordinators and bookers.

Laughs. That’s an interesting concept, huh? Trigger the laughs in the audience consistently–every 18-20 seconds, (that’s what they want at the clubs and on T.V.), and you will find yourself winning more competitions, booking more gigs and getting more work.

At the Comedy Clinic, we have broken comedy down into a science. Combining the science of laughter, (the 9 psychological laughter triggers that are hard-wired into our brains), with the 13 proven comedy structures that are used by all the top comedians.

Using the mechanics of comedy combined with your true persona and performance, delivers the best, crisp, laugh-filled comedy.

Our comedians prove it time and time again.

Great work Josh. I appreciate the shout-out, but remember I just gave you tools; YOU did the work!

Rock on!

Checkout our new upcoming classes and see if you’ll be the next winner of the next competition.

And while you’re at it, give a shout-out to Josh over on his page on Facebook.

What These Two Weiners Can Teach Us About Comedy

What these two wieners can teach us about comedy

What in the world of funny?!

I can’t believe this hack just did a joke on the name Weiner being so much like the hot dog wiener. Oh my God what a hack!

I can just hear it now all the super clever comedians out there skewering me for having the nerve to post such a ridiculously sophomoric statement.

But I have a point to this whole thing… I think.

There’s a trend out there in stand-up comedy land, kids. And the trend is for comics to be Bill Burr or Louis C.K.

The trend is to be clever just like them. You know, tell stories, make a profound statement. After all, wasn’t it George Carlin who said, “Don’t just make them laugh, make them think!”

I get it and I’m with you. I love to do think humor. I love to speak out with profundity and make a daring, yet good socio-political statement. I love to have the balls to “walk” a room.

T.V. Comedy is About Simplicity

But this post is about simplicity and its place in comedy; especially in television.

That’s right Simplicity. There’s a place for it and there’s big money in it.

What? Money you say?

We all want to be the clever Bill Burr or Louis C.K. but realize they started a long time ago and they didn’t start doing the stories you hear them do when they step on stage now .

They started with jokes. Writing jokes and telling jokes. (At least Burr did).

But you’re missing an element in your total game if you just stick to the clever story-teller comedy. There’s an angle you all should be working and that’s the angle of being able to write your one and two liner jokes.

Every comedian out there should be spending some time each day cranking out some solid one and two-liners. Honing that craft and getting good at it. Because one of the ways to be sure that you can survive in this business is to build multiple revenue streams.

One of those revenue streams could be writing for Late Night T.V.

The key to writing for Late Night T.V. is not the deep-meaning, clever, iconoclastic comedy. It is the simple association, simple surprise, short-form comedy concept that can play not only in New York and L.A. but in Middle America too.

One of those simple comedy structures is Double Entendre or wordplay comedy.

I took the pulse of my readers recently (all three of you) regarding wordplay humor and I got back some interesting feedback regarding the state of wordplay in comedy.

Most of it was like, “Dude Wordplay ain’t dead but it’s certainly on life support.”

I respect people’s opinions, even when the opinions are retarded. (See I can say “retarded” because I’m referring to an opinion–a thing, not a person… besides I know a lot of retarded things).

I jest, of course and I wouldn’t blame you for unsubscribing for that “retarded” comment, (but if you did you’d be retarded), because I’m about to show you why wordplay is alive and well–even a crucial skill you should refine, if not as a comedian, then as a writer.

Wordplay is Alive in the T.V. Comedy Writing Scene

Wordplay and double entendre is used in comedy writing on television like it’s nobody’s business. Late Night is chewing it up. It’s in commercials. It’s in Sitcoms.

Most of the successful shows on T.V. are using the Double-Entendre or wordplay comedy technique to get audiences to laugh and with great success.

You might not think that it works, but there’s an old saying in comedy and it’s “know your audience,” and I hate to be the bearer of bad news but Late Night isn’t playing to you.

If you’re reading this blog then you probably have at least a passing interesting in stand-up comedy or comedy writing and YOU are Late Night’s last target audience.

The audience that Late Night T.V. targets is the middle America audience. Mostly the male demo between eighteen and thirty-four.

They are targeting people who are tired after a long day of work and feeding the kids and dealing with the day’s errands, tasks and chores.

Late Night, for the most part is about simple humor. Don’t believe me? Check out this little bit from “The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon”

Steve Higgins and Jimmy do Scat. (As in scatological humor).

In the middle of the Pros and Cons desk piece, they go on a “fart and shart” riff that lasts an entire two minutes. Now two minutes is nothing in real time but in T.V. time is a good chunk.

Listen to the wordplay and tell me that it’s not funny. But remember. It’s not up to you and me. It’s up to the audience. And the audience is loving this stuff!

You’ll also find a ton of wordplay in “Arrested Development” and “How I Met Your Mother” two rather successful television shows.

And not only that, also in commercials. If you look at some of the funny commercials you’ll find that wordplay is used and used often.

Like in this ad for Discover Card.

Frog Protection – Discover Card

Consider the silliness of both. Consider how “hacky” either could appear if you did an amalgamation of either on stage in your stand-up at the Comedy Store.

But remember television writing is not necessarily about being clever, it is about being silly and getting the laugh.

Also consider that a Late Night Writer makes a minimum of $4000 per week and a copywriter for a huge marketing firm could be making upwards of $700k per year.

So while I dig doing clever, solid story-telling, stand-up, it might be wise for me financially to also hone my simple comedy skills like Double-Entendre and Wordplay. Because that kind of money doesn’t sound like it’s on life support.

Jon Stewart to Step Down From The Daily Show


jon-stewart-leaving-daily-show

Oh Snap!

If things weren’t explosive already when it comes to Late Night T.V. and variety T.V.

If you remember, the middle of last year I wrote about the changes in the Late Night T.V. scene are unprecedented in T.V. history with changes in The Tonight Show and Late Night on N.B.C.

Now things are heating up even more with the news of Jon Stewart announcing that he is stepping down from The Daily Show!

What? Say it ain’t so!

Jon Stewart has been the most trusted name in news and comedy for the last twenty years, while also developing and introducing some of the most talented people in comedy, like Stephen Colbert, who’s now replacing David Letterman and of course John Oliver, who now has a show on HBO.

And now the landscape in Late Night is changing drastically. This spells opportunity.

What This Means For You

This is epic news because when hosts change, writing staffs change and movement means more opportunity for comedy writers like you.

On top of that, how many new shows are going to attempt to pop up to replace Stewart and Colbert?

Other networks competing with Comedy Central may decide to try their hand to be the top hosted comedy/interview shows on cable.

With that in mind, how many of you have been continuously working on your Late Night Comedy Writing packet?

How many of you just wait for one opportunity and how many are writing every day with a goal of putting together two to three fresh packets a year or more?

How many of you know how to put together your sample packet?

How many of you look at it a such an overwhelming task that’s too big to tackle?

Anyone interested in this field of comedy, and those of you who have been to my seminars know that Late Night Writing should be a part of your arsenal to create your multiple-revenue-stream approach to the comedy business.

Here’s a couple of things you should be doing right now:

  • Watching and Recording the Late Night Show line up, including
    • Ellen
    • David Letterman
    • Jimmy Fallon
    • Jimmy Kimmel
    • Late Late Show
    • Seth Meyers
    • Carson Daly
    • Tavis Smiley
    • The Talk
    • Kelly & Michael
    • Ellen DeGeneres
    • Wendy Williams
    • Meredith Vieira
    • Queen Latifah
    • The Real
  • Study the hosts and learn their rhythms, persona and style.
  • Pick a few hosts to “write for”
  • Write down their jokes exactly as they say them
  • Write at least 10-25 jokes a day on headline news, celebrity culture, and trending news. If you can’t do 10-25, start with three jokes, then set goals each week to increase your production by one. In a couple of months, you’ll be up to 10 jokes a day, then 25. Trust me. This works. This is exactly how I did it, until I was writing up to 120 jokes per day. Boom!

Remember, this should be a process, not a one-time shot sort of thing. You just keep moving, keep writing and keep submitting. If you’re applying yourself and constantly testing your material against those already on T.V., soon the doors will open and you might actually find yourself on staff on one of these shows.

Get to work!