How To Be A Funny Woman | Comedian Plays The Kazoo With Her ‘Who’s-ee-whatzit!’

 

amy_gordon_stillAmy Gordon literally does her "no holes barred" approach to comedy. She’s a perfect example of how to be a funny woman. What makes this specific to a woman being funny? Well, the approach is all woman! If comedy is about surprise and shattering expectations, take a gander at how she approaches the mic with such a demure attitude, nicely dressed, carrying a purse, for crying out loud! But then… And if comedy is also about encountering obstacles as we try to accomplish something (Charlie Chaplin), she nails this in the most unexpected way. The reason she pulls this off is because there’s not a single time where she’s over-the-top. Everything is played as ‘real,’ from all of her expressions in the beginning to her trying (more obstacles) to hit the ‘high notes’ with the Kazoo. There are a few of reasons I posted this:

  1. To point out that when a comedian does an act-out like this the reactions have to be real. Comedy is about heighten REALITY, but it has to be real. If she went over-the-top with ‘mugging’ or was overtly sexy with the Kazoo ‘insertion’ (that just sounds weird doesn’t it?), then the piece would not play and the audience would be turned off. But she plays it just right, hitting all the beats on the way.
  2. The second reason I posted this is to show to those skeptical people out there that women CAN BE FUNNY, and this is a perfect example of how to be a funny woman.
  3. The third reason I’m posting this (and my original motivation for it), is to point out to the naysayers that just because she uses a prop doesn’t make it unfunny. One of my students was told by a "comedy teacher" not to do prop comedy. Let me put that bullshit to rest, there is nothing wrong with using a prop. But it’s like profanity; use it wisely. If you use a prop because you have no material, it will be viewed as just a distraction away from the fact that you don’t have any funny. Amy Gordon clearly has the audience "in love" with her and she’s using not one prop, but three, (four, if you include the purse).

You do have to be careful when you do prop comedy. Make sure the joke isn’t "punny," but solid. So take a look at this video. It’s 3:14 of solid laughs, right from the start and watch the way Amy uses every opportunity to trigger another laugh, while still keeping it real. This chick knows how to be a funny woman!

If you enjoy this video, please leave a comment. LET ME KNOW YOU’RE ALIVE!

 

How To Be A Famous Comedian | Interview with Louis CK

Comedian Louis C.K. Louis C.K. has been called the greatest comedian alive, by GQ Magazine. Louis is definitely at the top of his game. A lot of comedians out there and other students of comedy can learn a great lesson from listening to Louis in this rare 45-minute long interview on NPR. Keep in mind as you listen to Louis. He’s not in it for the money or the fame. He’s in it to be true to himself.

Also keep in mind that Louis C.K. first started in comedy in 1984. That means he’s been doing this for 27 years. So before you think that you’re not going anywhere or you get impatient with where your career is, think about the fact that this business is about perservering. This is one great comedian lesson.

I would like to thank my student David Conolly for sharing this.

I hope you enjoy this and if you do, please leave a comment below it will automatically leave a comment on your Facebook Page. Thanks!

Comedy Videos | Free Video Conversion Software

video cameraVideo is your calling card! As a comedian I like to post my videos online. I also post teaching videos, joke-writing videos, and other comedy video presentations. One of the problems I run into is that I need my video to be a specific format and it always seems like it’s not the right format for the hosting web page I’m trying to post it on.

More recently, the iPad and iPhone revealed that they don’t play flash video! So, if you want iPad and iPod users to be able to watch your videos, then you’re going to have to convert the video to mp4 format. I would recommend it since, in a recent report up to 20 percent of video watchers out there are watching videos on their iPads or iPhones. Considering that 9.1 million people Google the word “comedian” on a monthly basis, that’s just short of 2 million people that can’t see your video! That’s a lot of viewers! Don’t miss out on this demographic. Get your videos seen!

I’ve done some research when it comes to this and I have for you on my blog two video conversion programs that you can download and use for FREE! That’s right bitches, FREE! All you need to do is download it to your computer and start using it to convert your videos to the mp4 format so it’s viewable on Quicktime (Apple’s video format). Why would I take the time and write a blog about FREE video conversion software? Because (Big, hairy, creepy voice) “I love you!”  Here they are:

 

ANY VIDEO CONVERTER

Also, here’s something really cool “Any Video Converter” the screenshot you see below, also has a built-in YouTube video download application! That means you can download YouTube videos to your computer! Cool shit, huh? All you have to do is go to this page and download the the sofware by clicking the orange box that says “Download Free Video Converter.”

 

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HANDBRAKE 

Handbrake is an excellent video conversion software too! It’s fast. It’s easy. And it gets it right when it comes to the right conversion that will work with Apple video. The only shortcoming with Handbrake is that it does not seem to support Windows Media Video files, meaning that if you have a .WMV file, it does not recognize it and therefore won’t convert it. So grab handbrake for FREE and give it a test run. See how easy you can convert your favorite videos. And remember, it’s FREE!

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I hope this helps you to get your video up online. Keep your eyes open for more information when it comes to video and how to shoot it, get it online and get it recognized so that people will find it.

Treating Your Comedy Like a Science

test-tubeYou ever watch other comedians come to the club or the open-mic time and time again with new material? Are you envious? You ever watch other comedians just seemingly come up with material on the spot that makes you say to yourself “Genius! I wish I thought of that!” You ever wonder how they did it? How they seem to be able to do it time and time again?” You ask yourself how do they learn how to write comedy so well?

Well there are reasons that some comedians are good at this and some are not. In one instance you might say that a particular comedian is a “natural,” or he was “born with a gift.” But odds are he or she wasn’t “born with it” at all. Very few babies pop out of their mother’s womb saying stuff like “You call that a birth canal? It’s more like trying to push an egg through a stir stick!” or “Hey, Mom! Shave that! Haven’t you heard of a ‘Brazillian?’”

In most instances people who seem to be “born with it” actually had early exposure to comedy either through video or audio when they were younger. If you, as a child are exposed on a regular basis to the rhythms of comedy you begin to identify with comedy more readily and apply it in your life.

Your personality definitely has something to do with it. But the comedian then takes the next step and makes a conscious decision to actually apply it in their life. A light switch goes off and they say, “Hey, I can get laughs with this!” They then begin to recognize what they are doing that gets them laughter and they begin to replicate it. Whether they know it or not, they are learning how to write comedy.

A really good comedian will also study other comedians then apply some of the nuances to their material, recognizing patterns that seem to be consistently effective and use those in their approach to comedy. They see a comedian make an observational joke, then they observe something with a similar nuance and apply it to their repertoire.  As they get better at this, they may start writing this stuff down and then actually take the leap, build an act and start pursuing comedy. The more they do comedy the more they readily identify with the patterns and apply them more. 

For example, since I was seven years old, I listened to George Carlin, Richard Pryor and Bill Cosby, constantly. They all do a lot of observational material. When I was twelve, I went to the Post Office with my father. There was a sign on the door that said, “NO DOGS ALLOWED, EXCEPT ‘SEEING-EYE DOGS’.” I said, “Dad, what’s a ‘seeing-eye’ dog,” (imagining a dog with one really big ‘seeing’ eye…).

He said, “It’s a dog that helps blind people get around…”

I looked at the sign, looked at him and said, “Then who’s this sign for?”

He thought that was really funny. A few years later, I heard comedian Gary Shandling do that same thing as a joke and get really big laughs. I thought to myself, “Wow, if I just collected a whole bunch of those ideas, I could get laughs too!”

It’s almost like a guitar player. You ask any famous guitar player, they’ll tell you how they learned a riff from another guitar player then developed a variation or multiple variations on that riff, until they had their own brand. The more riffs they learn, the more they developed their own version, soon they are the guitar player everyone is emulating.

What’s my point? The point is that a comedian learns to identify with patterns that get laughs. When those “patterns”—whether they are rhythmical patterns or recognition patterns—are part of what some of us in comedy refer to as “comedy structure” or “comedy formula.”

Some comedians, like Dave Chappelle, for example (one of my absolute favorites) develop an understanding of these rhythms by trial and error and experience. Chappelle has been doing stand up comedy since he was thirteen. He has learned what seems to work by developing and tuning his instinct. Jerry Seinfeld (another favorite of mine) also works almost totally on instinct. And when I say instinct, they apply formulas and patterns—not consciously knowing the formula—but because it ‘feels’ right.

In my twenty-five years as a comedian, comedy writer and diligent student of comedy, I have identified 11 major comedy formulas used in comedy today. I’ve learned to memorize them and put them into practice on a regular basis. Now when I write comedy they almost automatically come out and get applied to my stories. They also are a part of my conversation and thought process. Learning these formulas has helped me become a solid comedy writer, being able to write 60-120 jokes a day or more, because studying the formulas helped me really learn how to write comedy. I use these formulas on a daily basis to write comedy and in one of my other blog posts I demonstrate how I do this to write 15 jokes on one topic in thirty minutes.

Once you learn that comedy does have rhythms and patterns (formulas and structure) that do get consistent laughs and in fact are the reason all comedians trigger laughter from an audience, you will be a better comedian and comedy writer yourself. Learning the formulas early helps you to cut through the learning curve and instead of being a comedian that relies purely on their instinct, you can be the comedian who knows why a joke is funny and how to put it into your comedy whenever you want. Then you’ll be the comedian who knows not only how to be funny, but also, how to write comedy.