Comedy Class | Burbank | Saturdays

 WE DEVELOP COMEDIANS!

“WINNER” – 2013 CALIFORNIA’S FUNNIEST FEMALE 

PAULINE YASUDA

“WINNER” – 2011 L.A.’S FUNNIEST COMIC (UNDER 2YRS) 

JC MORGAN

“2ND PLACE FINALIST” – 2012 L.A.’S FUNNIEST COMIC (UNDER 2YRS)

ESTHER HERSH


Latest Graduating class at the Comedy Store

Jerry Corley’s Stand Up Comedy Clinic is a powerful 8-week comedy class focusing on writing and performing comedy, followed by a performance at the world famous Comedy Store.

Can you learn to be funny? Once you learn the structure of comedy and the secrets to what makes people laugh, you can learn to build those into your conversations and write them into your comedy routines. So the answer is a resounding YES! You can learn to be funny! We have student after student who can prove it too!

You know the difference between a chuckle and a triggered laugh. You’ve experienced it either by receiving it from your friends, family or an audience. You’ve had your own laugh reflex push out the laugh when something funny triggered your laughter. comedy seminar photo1

 

Now, how do you write material that can trigger laughter in others? Are you born with that gift or can it be taught?


JERRY CORLEY CAN TEACH YOU HOW TO BE FUNNY! 

From 4-7:30 PM, each Saturday evening, for 8 weeks. You will learn what triggers human laughter, how to write and deliver jokes that trigger that laughter. You will also learn some of the most powerful comedy skills in the trade, and  how to make money in the comedy business. 

Whether you want to be a comedian, a humor columnist, sitcom or screenplay writer, this class is for you!

We also offer Tuesday Night Classes!

Visit the website link at the bottom of this page for more info!

THE MOST POWERFUL COMEDY CLASS IN THE BUSINESS…BAR NONE! 

 

NEW CLASSES FORMING. SIGN UP NOW!


BE FUNNY.    GET PAID.    ANY QUESTIONS?

Visit StandUpComedyClinic.com for more details!

 

Appear in a Real Motion Picture!

stretch-promo-extrasAs some of you may have heard, my little T.V. show idea, “Stretch,” has been turned into a Big Movie Idea! This process started many years ago, when I was touring 43 weeks a year as a comedian.

My wife wanted me to be home more, so to save my marriage, I cut my road work in half.

During that time, while I was in town, I worked at a limousine company in L.A., both driving and in operations.

While I was working the late night shift, I would sneak in some time at the computer to write some scripts. One of the scripts I wrote was a television show about the limo business. It was going to be kind of a ‘Taxi’ but for limousines. 

I brought my friend, (and now writing partner), Rob Rose, in on it, for his brutally fast and sharp wit.

Needless to say, years and one marriage later it has been turned into a comedy-thriller that will be directed by Joe Carnahan (“The Grey,” “The A-Team”).

It’s legit. It has star power from Chris Pine,(Star Trek)  Ed Helms, (The Office, Hangover I, II, III) Patrick Wilson, (The A-Team) and Jessica Biel!

To top it off, it has already been picked up to be distributed by Universal Pictures.

It’s shooting in Los Angeles in July and they are holding an “Open Call” for upscale, trendy club-goers.

It’s simple to get involved, just e-mail stretchcasting@gmail.com and include your name, phone number, email and a picture of yourself in high-end Hollywood nightclub attire. Which means, ladies look smoking hot, and guys look like the typical Hollywood, club-going, douche. Smile

Don’t email me. I have zero input on what happens with this!

One of the things you have to get used to once you sell the rights to your movie is that your creative input goes “poof!”

I hope some of my readers (all 3 of you), can take advantage of this cool opportunity to get involved, not only to be seen in a film with a tight script, but also mingle and have the opportunity to meet other people.

Please read the fine print. There is NO GUARANTEE that when you participate in this event that you will be seen in the motion picture!

But, Hollywood’s a weird place and anything can happen!

There’s has been and there is going to continue to be a lot of really cool lessons to learn from this experience of getting a movie made. I hope to share them with you so maybe you can get some inspiration to expand your writing.

Good luck!

Patton Oswalt: “I stole a Joke. Not consciously.”

patton-oswaltIn a recent blog post about joke-thieving, I posted that Howie Mandel allegedly caught a comedian named Greg Wilson “stealing” a joke on America’s Got Talent.

It generated a lot of comments; some agreeing, some disagreeing with my post, some attacked, some complimented. Some people sent private emails to avoid getting into it in the comment thread.

The piece was written in a heightened way to draw attention to a dilemma we always face as writers and comedians; intellectual property theft.

Whether it’s a joke or a movie script or a television pilot idea, I’ve experienced it personally at several levels. And I expect to experience it more.

But the questions remain:

What do you do about it when it happens to you?

How do you keep from doing it yourself?

Who cares if I use someone else’s material?

I think the best advice I got on joke-stealing is from Jay Leno. He said, “Just write faster than everyone else and your reputation will precede you.”

He also says to people that accuse him of stealing a joke, “You keep it. I’ll write more.” Great advice. I highly recommend not only following it, but making it your code.

My Irish temper sometimes impedes my ability to make sound and reasonable decisions in a lot of situations. It can especially get in the way when someone steals a joke.

Temper can manifest itself in many ways. It once manifested in the Comedy Store parking lot with another comedian’s bloody head bouncing off the hood of a Trans Am.

Some of you might be saying, “Oh my God, Jerry! I can’t believe you would do such a thing to a Trans Am!”

Why not? It was the nineties and Trans Ams were so previous decade!

Despite the fact that I’m no longer the guy who reacts like that, I still like to defer to people who are smarter when it comes to trying to sort out an answer to a popular problem…

Patton Oswalt is smart, funny involved and completely dedicated to the business of comedy. I follow his tweets (when I can) and read his “Spew.

I think it’s always a good idea to follow people who are smarter than you, funnier than you and ultimately more successful than you so that you can continue your journey to be the best you can be.

One of the suggestions he gives in his “Closed Letter To Myself about Thievery, Heckling and Rape Jokes,” is to let the joke thief steal. Eventually he’ll reach that point of no return, where the thief will—with the help of other comedians’ material—reach the level of network T.V. as a performer or a writer, then crash and burn because they didn’t get to that level by developing their own creativity.

Because at that level when it’s all on them to ‘create,’ their creative well is a dust bowl. They become the reason for their own demise.

So take some time (it’s a long piece so grab some coffee), and give Patton’s article a read. I think he’s got a better solution to understanding the thievery dilemma than I.

I mean, unless you really hate Trans Ams.

Tenacious D Is Putting On a Comedy Festival in L.A.

Great News!
Fresh from the wire over at Technology Tell’s entertainment blog:
Tenacious D is planning the Festival Supreme, a music and comedy festival of the like Los Angeles has never seen. It’s the first of it’s kind in my memory. It will be featuring top comedians and performers like Zach Galifianakis, Adam Sandler, The Mr. Show Experience (featuring David Cross and Bob Odenkirk), and Reggie Watts.
Sarah Silverman is also slated to perform.

The great news is that this is a real comedy festival with real stars!

It’ll be interesting to see how L.A. supports an event like this. Considering you can usually get a pretty decent lineup of top comics almost any night of the week at any one of  the top comedy clubs in L.A. But it’s usually a surprise, as opposed to a scheduled festival.

What’s the schedule? Glad you asked! Keep Saturday, October 19th open and save your pennies; ninety-nine thousand of them to be exact, because the tickets to this bad boy are starting at $99.

Not too bad a price considering there are going to be four stages all at, or around, the Santa Monica pier.

Sounds like fun! In fact I’m gonna head over to the festival’s website right now and get a couple of tix!

Stop Thinking Like an Employee

assembly-lineOne of my comedian friends was recently brutally upset by the fact that he had to pay an admission fee to a comedy competition to be considered for it. He failed get into one of the regional prelim competitions so he was told by the organizer that he needed to resubmit in order to be considered for other regional prelims.

He was very upset by this and felt unsatisfied when he vented his frustration to the organizer who runs the festival, so he went public. He vented his frustration on Facebook and Twitter, “exposing” the principal of this festival. In addition, he made various personal accusations and assumptions about the organizer with other comedians in the thread, slinging insults about not only how unprofessional the guy was but also about his clothing and spelling.

WTF?!

The irony being that if you’re accusing someone of being unprofessional while slinging insults about a person’s spelling, clothing, financial situation or other personal attacks, YOU are the one who is being unprofessional.

Pretty ugly.

It all boiled down to one thing. The comedian who was upset spent “seventy dollars” to not even be considered for the competition.

All around; very frustrating. I get it.

This comedian is not alone in his complaint. There are a ton of other comedians who are upset by the results of competitions and the expenditure of real dollars to get into these competitions or to go out on the road, etc.

Let me try to sort some of it out…

This is show-business. Show business is two words, there’s the “show” and there’s the “business.” This business is no different than any other business in that you have to spend money to make money. You have to speculate to accumulate. Sometimes you have to raise the money to be able to invest it in your business. How you raise the money is up to you. But spending money on an administrative fee for a competition is a necessary cost of doing business.

It’s hard for creative people to deal with that, but…

That’s the way it goes.

I remember, a number of years ago, having to pay $25 dollars to a comedy booking company for them to take the time to look at my tape. I’m old school and didn’t believe in so-called PAY-TO-PLAY. So I bitched and moaned to my wife and my parents and any one else who would listen to me about how I thought I was getting “screwed.”

But this particular booker had 25 weeks of work on their schedule. I paid the $25 dollars, didn’t get a review in the time they allotted. I submitted again, paid another $25. Same thing. I sent a letter (remember, it was before e-mail).

They sent a letter back saying that they had so many submissions, that sometimes they just can’t get to a tape before the deadline and that I would have to submit again. I did. Another $25. I was already $75 in the hole! This time they called me and offered me a week of work as a feature act. I thanked them for considering me and while I had them on the phone I said that I would be traveling all the way from Los Angeles to the East coast to do this gig. “Is there any way you could tack on a couple more weeks so I can better justify the cost of travel?” They did. (In business, it’s called an ‘upsell.’). While you have them saying ‘yes,’ get them to say “YES” again!

Sort of like doing your act. If they laugh at the punch line, tag it, top it and do an act-out, to get more laughs from one premise. Same concept.

They gave me 2 more weeks. While on the gig I met the headliner who taught me how to sell t-shirts. I had a great time, gave them solid shows. I showed up early, and I over delivered. I made it my goal to give them the best shows that I was capable of. Then I called their assistant, asked what kind of wine they drank and sent them a “thank-you” case of Merlot; $110. They called me, thanked me for the wine and booked be for 10 more weeks that year.

In total I spent $75 on the submission, $110 on the wine. That’s $185.

That year according to the W-9 I received from them, I made $8250.00. Not a ton of money, but remember I was working as a feature act.

Most Comedians Think Like Employees

Was it worth it for me to spend $75 for the submission, then $110 for the wine? You bet!

But most comedians don’t think this way. In fact, most comedians lack even basic business acumen. Because most comedians think like EMPLOYEES.

How many comedians know the average profit margin of the average business? How many know the definition of cost-basis? I’d bet that there’s not many. Because traditionally our experience is as an employee. Why should I have to spend money in order to get paid?

But you’re not an employee, you’re a business. So it’s time to start thinking the way businesses think. And that’s profit margin and cost-basis.

A quick “ALT-TAB” over to Yahoo Finance, will tell you that the overall average profit margin of all the industries listed is 7.8 percent. What?! 7.8 percent net profit margin?!

After investing $185 in the booker, (all tax deductible, don’t ya know), I made approximately 45 times what I spent. That, by the way, puts all industries listed on the stock exchange to shame in terms of profit.

Would I have earned that if I just bitched about it?

So suck it up, guys. You may have gotten into comedy to skirt the system or not do a nine-to-five or get out of the “rat-race,” Not participate in the business world.

But here’s the reality: You are not only in the business world. YOU are the BUSINESS!

The beauty of it is, is that the business is COMEDY! Hell yeah!

Tune in, tune up, and kick ass!

Have any ideas you can share with how you make a living? Love to hear them!